What's in an enzyme.

All general audio posts go here.
Daniel Quinn
Posts: 7983
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:16 am
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 84 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Daniel Quinn »

That's precisely what I'm doing.

But in using an enzyme stain remover and an enzyme record cleaner.
.

Ordinaryman
Posts: 246
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:50 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 16 times
Great Britain

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Ordinaryman »

Interesting, are you using them combined?

Daniel Quinn
Posts: 7983
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:16 am
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 84 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Daniel Quinn »

No. I'm going to clean seperate coffee stain samples (organic stain) with them both.

Then I will move on to cleaning two records.

Ordinaryman
Posts: 246
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:50 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 16 times
Great Britain

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Ordinaryman »

I assume having cleaned separate coffee stain samples (organic) you will then refresh the fluid? otherwise would there not be some "cross contamination" of the" two records"? and then of course there is the question of similar dilutions ,ambient temperature et,etc,etc

Ordinaryman
Posts: 246
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:50 pm
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 16 times
Great Britain

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Ordinaryman »

Addendum. I have found over the years the urine i have extracted on a day to day basis seems to work best.

User avatar
guydarryl
Posts: 1136
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:43 pm
Location: suffolk
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by guydarryl »

Many years ago I worked on photographic film research.

To remove gelatin (a protein) which "held" the silver salts (and recover the silver from photographic film) we used pepsin - it works best in acidic conditions and at 30 - 40 degrees c - rather like your stomach conditions.

https://www.philipharris.co.uk/product/ ... g/b8a01879

Needs to be handled with great care - it does digest proteins!

I would guess that most enzyme record cleaners are bull, as surely the temperatures they are used at are quite low and so the "dwell time" required to digest proteins (from finger prints etc) would be longer than the time the record is left in contact with the solution?
LP12,Ittok,DV10X5,Phono2(twin supply),P50/A40's,LS5,SSC,Rega Ela mk1/Cube 3's
Sony cdp xb930,Alessandro ms1

Daniel Quinn
Posts: 7983
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:16 am
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 84 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Daniel Quinn »

Modern day ones can work at low temperatures.

And my ultrasonic cleaner cleans at anything up to 50 degrees. I use 35 degrees. Which is higher than enzymes in washing powder are used at for delicate washing.

Geoff.R.G
Posts: 884
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2016 2:46 pm
Location: Denham UK
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 63 times
Great Britain

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Geoff.R.G »

Daniel Quinn wrote:
Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:01 pm
That's precisely what I'm doing.

But in using an enzyme stain remover and an enzyme record cleaner.
Sounds like a good approach, I'll be interested to see your results.

User avatar
guydarryl
Posts: 1136
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:43 pm
Location: suffolk
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 3 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by guydarryl »

Daniel Quinn wrote:
Sat Oct 03, 2020 10:49 am
Modern day ones can work at low temperatures.

And my ultrasonic cleaner cleans at anything up to 50 degrees. I use 35 degrees. Which is higher than enzymes in washing powder are used at for delicate washing.
Not sure where you get your information about "modern enzymes".

Enzymes are "biological catalysts" they have been around since the dawn of life. As I said most have an optimum temperature of about 35 to 40 degrees centigrade - above this they denature (break down), below this they are not as fast at digesting.

Biological washing powders remove the necessity for a boil wash, but the enzymes (lipases and proteases) will still work, say at 30 degrees c, albeit slower than they would at optimum temperature, as they are working in combination with plenty of agitation and high surfactant concentrations.

Most enzyme record cleaners were developed/sold before ultrasonic cleaning became popular for records, so I stick by my initial thought that using them on records is bull. By all means though, go ahead and try - the link I gave will save you money (unless you are thinking of using Persil or similar :lol:)
LP12,Ittok,DV10X5,Phono2(twin supply),P50/A40's,LS5,SSC,Rega Ela mk1/Cube 3's
Sony cdp xb930,Alessandro ms1

Daniel Quinn
Posts: 7983
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 7:16 am
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 84 times

Re: What's in an enzyme.

Unread post by Daniel Quinn »

Your conclusion isn't supported by your propositions.

You admit that enzymes can work at 30 degrees or less, yet you maintain them working in records in 'bull'

These 2 propositions do not support each other unless and until you introduce new information.

Post Reply